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Blogs

Wed
18
Feb
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This Date in UCSF History: Vol. 44, No. 16, Feb. 16, 1970

By Taylor LaFlam
Science Editor

A single front-page headline, reading “the tuition battle—bleed for UC,” was starkly superimposed on a full-page photograph of a well-known politician, standing stern-faced at a lectern. The lower left corner of the page read simply, “In this corner … Ronald Reagan, governor of California.”

Wed
18
Feb
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Let's Get Physical...Therapy!: Change Your Breathing—Now!

Columnist

Recently I attended the Anesthesia Grand Rounds’ “Updates in Pain Management.” (Yes—we physical therapy students are involved!) The event featured many well-known practitioners, and a psychologist in particular brought my attention back to the diaphragm. C3, C4, C5 keep the diaphragm alive, may be where some individuals’ knowledge of the diaphragm starts and ends—but not for UCSF students!

Diaphragm 101

Wed
18
Feb
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UCSF Journal Club: Recent research

By Taylor LaFlam
Science Editor

MICROBIOLOGY: Use of 16S rRNA gene for identification of a broad range of clinically relevant bacterial pathogens. Srinivasan, R., et al. (Lynch, S.V.). PLoS One. 2015. 10(2):e0117617.

Definitive diagnosis of infectious diseases frequently rests on growing a culture of the offending organism—this can be a time-consuming process and not all bacteria can be successfully cultured.

Wed
18
Feb
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[Exit Pursued by Science] - Tumor immunology takes off

By Hanna Starobinets
Staff Writer

Live from the Tumor Immunology Keystone Symposium in Banff, Canada

Tue
21
Oct
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UCSF Journal Club: Recent research by UCSF scientists

By Taylor LaFlam
Science Editor
 
MICROBIOLOGY: A systematic analysis of biosynthetic gene clusters in the human microbiome reveals a common family of antibiotics. Donia, M.S., et al. (Fischbach). Cell. 2014. 158:1402-1414.
 
Scientists increasingly appreciate that the huge number of microorganisms living on the human body do not merely exist passively, but rather interact heavily with the cells of the body, each influencing the other. These interactions often rely on small molecules produced by the microbiota.
 

Wed
24
Sep

Incoming students overwhelmed by plethora of cheap housing

UCSF’s newest class of students recently arrived from all over the country to start a life in one of the United States’ most iconic and popular cities. As in previous years, students were pleasantly surprised to discover the abundance of affordable housing options in the city.

Thu
22
May
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UCSF Journal Club: Recent research by UCSF scientists

By Taylor LaFlam
Staff Writer

IMMUNOLOGY: Host cell polarity proteins participate in innate immunity to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Tran, C.S., Eran, Y., et al. (Engel). Cell Host Microbe. 2014. 15(5):636-43.

Skin and mucosal surfaces form a critical first barrier to infection. They serve not simply as a passive wall but as a sentry, often detecting impinging pathogens and calling for help from immune cells.               

Thu
15
May
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Medical Mythbusters - Protein Powder

Jenny Qi is a third-year BMS student.

Thu
08
May
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UCSF Journal Club: Recent research by UCSF scientists

By Taylor LaFlam
Staff Writer

BIOCHEMISTRY: A pause sequence enriched at translation start sites drives transcription dynamics in vivo. Larson, M.H., et al. (Weissman). Science. 2014 May 1. Epub ahead of print.

In high school biology class, RNA transcription is usually depicted as a smooth process of polymerase binding followed by steady transcription of the whole gene. In fact, transcription proceeds fitfully, with a number of pauses playing regulatory roles.

Thu
01
May
Jenny Qi's picture

Medical Mythbusters - Exercising When You're Sick

By Jenny Qi

 

Jenny Qi is a third-year BMS student.

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