This Date in UCSF History

A photo of a packet of birth control pills circa 1960s.
This week, Synapse proudly resumes the historical column, This Date in UCSF History, where we take a look at the issues making campus news throughout the newspaper’s 60-year existence. We start with a headline from 50 years ago.
Photo of President Jimmy Carter circa 1977.

Despite President Donald Trump’s assertion that “Nobody knew healthcare could be so complicated,” it has, in fact, been a thorn in the side of presidents for decades.

On this day 23 years ago, Synapse featured master’s and doctoral nursing students receiving prestigious research awards, scholarships and recognition for their studies and exemplar work in the field of nursing.

On this day in 1998, in the seemingly not-so-distant UC past, the Synapse front page read, “One Year After Merger, UCSF Stanford Faces Unexpected Problem”.

Aerial view of UCSF parnassus campus in 1980.
Today, we have grown accustomed to fees increasing on an annual basis, to perpetual meetings with UC officials, and to student groups protesting against the outrageous cost of public education, a commodity that was once free to all Californians.
Image of UCSF students protesting in San Francisco street.

Fifty years ago in 1965, a headline on the front page of Synapse read, “Revolution, Response: Viet Program Here.” On this day, the UC Medical Center (UCMC) presented an international symposium titled Revolution and Response in the Millberry Union

On this day in 1987, Dr. Dorothy Ford Bainton became the UCSF School of Medicine's first woman chair of the Department of Pathology. She was the first woman to chair a department in the school since its founding as Toland Medical College in 1864.
The Synapse issue that came out 25 years captured an exciting time in UCSF history. The front page was crowded with a number of memorable stories, with front-page stories “Doogie Howser Appointed to Faculty”, by Jean Yuss, “Trump Buys UCSF”, by Lo Sell Hi, and “UC cardiologist to fight Mike Tyson,” by Lowell Comb.
Four decades ago, the Synapse front page captured the discontent that would lead to this cap, which was just one of several measures in the Medical Injury Compensation Reform Act of 1975. “Legislature Stymied: Malpractice Crisis Threatens Hospital Jobs,” declared the headline of an article by Jacquelyn Brown. An accompanying article by Peter Bissell was headlined “Bay Area Doctor Protests Soaring Malpractice Rates.”
Cartoon character sitting down reading and upside down book, with tears rolling down his face
A half century ago, more than 95 percent of doctors were men and more than 95 percent of nurses were women. A couple of articles in the Synapse echoed this particularly stark gender gap with evidence of a particularly gendered idea of nursing.