Research Spotlight

“Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you what you are,” Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, 1826.

What you consume not only affects the health and appearance of your body, but also the integrity of the mind.

Nearly 73,000 adults will be diagnosed with a brain tumor in 2016, and for more than one third, their tumor will be declared incurable. Large, collaborative efforts like The Cancer Genome Atlas have helped scientists better understand the genetic changes that define primary tumors, but this information alone is not enough to beat cancer.
In human cells, three billion base pairs arrange themselves into sequences of As, Ts, Gs, and Cs to form genes. However, despite its large size, only 1% to 2% of the human genome is actually organized into genes. So, what does the remaining, mysterious, 98% of the human genome do?
With the successful creation of DNA vaccines that elicited immune protection from Zika infection, hope is on the rise in the fight against this awful virus.
“Would you rather live forever or die in the next five seconds?” This question was posed to me recently and I was flummoxed. Most people, according to the asker, say they would die in the next five seconds. It took me much longer than five seconds to answer, so I guess I was already doomed to an eternal life and to the painful demands of being a thinking, sentient lifeform forever.

From the perspective of noise, CRISPR systems are modern biology’s closest approximation to Beyonce’s Lemonade or Game of Thrones: buzz-worthy, trending, think-pieced-to-paralysis.

When I lie on San Francisco’s Ocean Beach and focus my vision softly on the undulating water, I imagine the life that swarms underneath the ocean’s surface. The fish, the sharks, even the tiny happy phytoplankton, all bumping and grinding amongst one another like puckish tipsy high-schoolers. I imagine this happens all over the ocean, a teeming sea of water and fish and water again.
The recent outbreak of Zika virus in Central and South America correlates with a spike in birth defects, the first and foremost being microcephaly, a severe impairment of brain development. In Brazil, 1,113 cases of microcephaly have been confirmed, with 3,836 more suspected (as of April 12th, according to the Brazilian Health Ministry). The World Health Organization has declared this spike in microcephaly and other defects to be a global health emergency. The White House has asked Congress for $1.9 billion and has already transferred $510 million previously earmarked for an Ebola response.

Once every academic quarter, the UCSF Mission Bay campus takes on a new character. Normally unlocked buildings are barricaded and guarded by (mostly) men with guns.

Cells are more like corporations than they are like people. Uncountable tasks need be accomplished, and each protein is specialized to do one, at most a few, jobs. The job titles are unceremonious and garbled.