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Food

Wed
21
Jan

The Scoop Swich-es It Up

Photo credit: Dawn Maxey

By Dawn Maxey
Staff Writer

At a recent residency interview, a program director asked me if I had tried Swich, a new dessert destination in the Central Sunset.

As a Scoop writer, I was embarrassed to say I hadn’t even heard of it. Upon further investigation, I discovered that Swich took over the storefront that formerly housed a well-loved TuttiFrutti frozen yogurt shop. It is part of the trend of pick-your-own-combo ice cream sandwich shops infiltrating The City.

Despite our horrid experience at CREAM, that insufferable Bay Area ice cream sandwich chain, Theresa and I decided to cast aside our doubts about ice cream sandwiches and give it a whirl.
Before I go any farther, I should make one thing clear: Cookies are at the bottom of my dessert hierarchy. Ice cream is stuff of the Gods; why ruin it with a cookie that neither enhances the flavor nor serves as an appropriate vehicle for eating more ice cream?

Wed
03
Dec

The Scoop: Lush Gelato, No Bath Bombs Here

By Theresa Poulos
Staff Writer

While the word “lush” most often conjures up images of a night out with a lightweight pharm student, a new gelato joint on Polk Street has given the word new meaning. Lush Gelato is an East Bay favorite that has expanded to a small new shop in Nob Hill. Owner and gelato master Federico Murtaugh has amassed a following at his Oakland and Berkeley stores, and it was only a matter of time before his inventive flavors would make their way across the Bay.

Wed
05
Nov

The Scoop: Eatwell Farm’s Ice Box

A creamy tower of vanilla chocolate swirl soft serve is made fresh on site and costs $5.

by Theresa Poulos and Dawn Maxey
Staff Writers

Soft serve, the texturally challenged cousin to regular ice cream, often gets pushed to the wayside in favor of its heartier counterpart. But The Scoop team made a trip to that wayside to check out a new store on the block: Eatwell Farm’s Ice Box.

The uniquely named shop, just a short walk from Parnassus in the Upper Haight, is the creation of Nigel Walker, a farmer who owns Eatwell Farm in Dixon, CA, and Roma Gray, a self-described ice cream connoisseur.

Ice Box began as a food truck business, selling its wares at the Ferry Plaza Farmer’s Market and Off the Grid events. It recently moved to the inside of Second Act on Haight Street – a public gathering space and small collection of food shops.

Thu
22
May

The Scoop: A Frozen Section of Holy Gelato!

Holy Gelato! offers 12 non-dairy options in addition to 18 gelato flavors. Photo by Dawn Maxey/MS4

By Dawn Maxey and Theresa Poulos
Staff Writers

It’s strange how we tend to overlook gems in our own backyard, so for this installment of The Scoop, we brought one of UCSF’s finest Pathologists along to a nearby gelato shop, so that we wouldn’t miss even the most microscopic of details.

Holy Gelato! is located just blocks away from UCSF’s Parnassus campus, and it was only recently that the Scoop team realized that we had never given it a hard-hitting, newsworthy review. We were accompanied by guest reviewer Dr. Raga Ramachandran, a Pathologist beloved amongst UCSF medical students, to help us analyze a sweeter variety of frozen sections.

Thu
15
May

The Scoop: Hey Diddle Diddle, There’s a New Ice Cream Shop in Town!

This newcomer to the San Francisco ice cream scene has already opened two locations (one in the Marina district and another on the Embarcadero) since December of 2013. Photo by Dawn Maxey/MS4

By Theresa Poulos
Staff Writer

After our recent East Bay ice cream sandwich debacle (Synapse 4/17/14, “Dream vs CREAM”), the Scoop team approached our next tasting destination—Over The Moon—with a mix of hope and trepidation. This newcomer to the SF ice cream scene has already opened two locations (one in the Marina district and another on the Embarcadero) since December of 2013. It has a 4.5 star rating on Yelp along with an enchanting website; and yes, they offer custom-made ice cream sandwiches in addition to scoops. With a sunny Saturday afternoon on hand, we made our way to Over The Moon’s Marina location to investigate.

Thu
08
May
Sam Lee's picture

Lazy Bear: Fine Dining, Pop-Up Style

Chef David Barzelay of Lazy Bear greets diners and describes the evening's menu. Photo by Sam Lee/MEPN1

By Sam Lee
Staff Writer

When I saw the confirmation e-mail in my inbox from Lazy Bear, my heart felt like I just won the Yerba Buena Dream House raffle! I couldn’t believe that I got a pair of coveted seats on my first attempt through their convoluted reservation system. Most people try for at least 3 months before scoring a spot. I'm thinking that perhaps the alignment of the Sun, Earth and Moon during April's blood moon eclipse might have had something to do with my good fortune.

Lazy Bear is an acclaimed underground pop-up restaurant in the Mission and an anagram of Chef David Barzelay's last name. It is the fanciest and most expensive meal I have had in San Francisco, but considering the value of the experience I think it’s something worth checking out even on a student budget! I only had to live off of instant ramen for about two weeks to help pay for my meal.

Thu
01
May
Hannah Patzke's picture

When Life Gives You Lemons…

Photo courtesy of flickr/alpha

By Hannah Patzke
Staff Writer

Lemon season for the Bay Area is just around the corner and I usually find myself with an excess of lemons to use.  For reasons unfathomable to my roommates and me, the previous owners of our house planted not one, not two, but rather 11 lemon trees. 

Now, don’t misunderstand me.  I understand the joy of citrus.  I was that little girl on your street who made a lemonade stand every summer and sold glasses of free squeezed juice for a quarter.  But 11 trees entirely full of lemons seems a bit excessive.  Why not throw in an orange tree?  Or really mix it up with some kiwi and avocado (I may be revealing my novice gardener status here—I have no idea if these trees would grow in our climate)?  Yet the fact remains that we have 11 trees full to bursting with lemons every spring.  So what to do? 

Thu
17
Apr

Dreams Vs CREAM: The Battle of the Ice Cream Sandwich

2.	The line for the popular ice cream shop CREAM in Berkeley regularly extends around the corner and down the block. Photo by Dawn Maxey/MS3

By Dawn Maxey
Staff Writer

CREAM is a Telegraph Avenue staple, serving a big scoop of ice cream sandwiched between two freshly baked cookies for the bare bones price of $2. The line regularly extends around the corner and down the block. In January, a competitor shop named Scoop Dreams opened up directly across the street, offering its own homemade ice cream sandwiches for the same price.

Battling ice cream sandwich joints? This was an opportunity too good for The Scoop team to pass up. With special guest reviewer pediatrician Abhay Dandekar, we traveled to Berkeley to assess the competition.

Thu
10
Apr

A Hike and A Hearty Brunch in the East Bay

Alem's Coffee in Rockridge serves this Ethiopian specialty, shiyan phool, on weekends. Photo by Akshay Govind

By Akshay Govind
Associate Editor

Having been given the good fortune of sunshine on a much needed weekend off, I decided to head out to the East Bay for a casual hike and a hearty Eritrean brunch, both recommendations of my sister.

 Redwood Regional Park, lying in the hills just east of Oakland (about 35 minutes from UCSF), was our first stop. The park, part of the East Bay Regional Park District, contains several miles of nicely maintained trails that wind their way gently enough to allow for mountain biking, trail running, horseback riding or hiking. The part district website (ebparks.org/parks/redwood) is a little clumsy, but the park itself is quite easily navigable, with plenty of maps available at the various parking lots.

Thu
10
Apr

Spring Brings Wild Greens: Miner’s Lettuce

By T. Booth Haley
Staff Writer

The rain has come, the equinox has passed and California is green again.  While our water reservoirs are still alarmingly low, local wild plants are now proliferating.  You might be surprised how many of those fresh green leaves and shoots are edible.  Recently I sampled one that is new to me, but will be familiar to anyone who was around in the Gold Rush days: miner’s lettuce, Claytonia perfoliata.

While the ubiquitous wild fennel has a strong licorice taste and the ever-abundant nasturtium can be bracingly spicy, miner’s lettuce is mild enough in flavor that it’s pretty much unobjectionable to all but the pickiest child. Its closest domesticated analog would be spinach, and they can be used in all the same ways: raw in a salad, steamed, quick-fried with garlic etc.  It is high in vitamin C, which those malnourished miner’s appreciated for warding off scurvy in the days before California became a citrus paradise.

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