​With the advent of CRISPR technology, editing human genomes is no longer the stuff of science fiction. But Hank Greely, a Stanford law professor and bioethicist, isn’t too concerned: “I don’t think it’s very important, I don’t think it’s gonna happen, but I don’t care about it even if it does,” he remarked (perhaps with a bit of tongue in his cheek), speaking at UCSF in January.

Our DNA fits into our cells by tightly coiling into structures called chromosomes. During cell division, the machinery that is responsible for DNA replication cannot replicate the very ends of chromosomes, so some genetic information may be lost d

“Natural selection making 'education genes' rarer.” “Intelligence is being bred out of the gene pool.” Can you recognize which of these headlines is realistic or exaggerated? The answer is that each is a little of both — and they’re reflective of a disturbing trend. These and other current headlines are skewing real science.
​By co-founding one medical startup company, a UCSF alumni is breaking several barriers at once. Dr. Sophia Yen, M.D., M.P.H., UCSF alumni of 1997, is striving to ease access to birth control while also encouraging women and minorities into an underrepresented field.

With a background spanning everything from philosophy to botany to structural biology, Dr.

Looking for mentoring opportunities? Want to make a difference in the lives of San Francisco youth? The Science and Health Education Partnership (SEP) at UCSF needs you!

“I initially got interested in research as I wanted to have a broader public health impact beyond the bedside, and realized that research was one way of applying that.

Wearing my white coat with my stethoscope hanging around my neck, I knock. I introduce myself while going through a checklist in my mind: say hello, ask how the patient would like to be addressed, start with the chief complaint.

Don’t miss Dr. Matt Springer's crucial home earthquake preparedness presentations at UCSF. Many people who have recently moved to the San Francisco Bay Area do not realize that it is imperative to arrange their homes to prevent serious damage and injury due to an earthquake, while many long-time residents mistakenly think they are prepared because they have extra water — and students assume that quakes wait until after they get their degrees and move away.

It’s hard to believe that only five and a half months ago I anticipated sacrificing all free weekends, dreaded walking up the seriously underestimated hills of San Francisco, and walked into class with nonexistent anatomy knowledge among other thi