The chair squeaked quietly as I fidgeted, swiveling left, right, left. I sat toward the back of a long wooden table flanked by my fellow graduate students, while a pair of eminent biologists led a discussion on how to talk to skeptical non-scientists about evolution. Perhaps it was an intrinsic bias instilled by our families, or a side-effect of years spent steeping in the world of science; whatever the case, as we sat in that conference room we discussed those who dared to disbelieve as if they were at best misguided lambs to be converted and at worst heretical fanatics, frothing at the mouth and waving crosses wildly to fend off fish with feet.

“Growing up in a more rural area of California, I was always curious about the greater world. I found the diverse array of customs, beliefs, and for some reason politics across the globe to be fascinating.

It was a crazy week for science. Naturally, there was a media firestorm following the inauguration of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States. To the surprise of many, science was at the forefront of several controversies. Scientists are now organizing a “March for Science,” inspired by the Women’s March on Washington.

By Ray

With a generous gift from the Helen Diller Foundation, UCSF has been able to finally answer the question, “What would you do if you won the lottery?”

“I go to sleep at 10 and wake up at 5. I try to eat healthy and to avoid eating out on the weekdays at all costs. People laugh at me saying, ‘girl relax, eat what you want, and just live life”.

In the fight against cancer, harnessing the natural defense mechanisms within the human body is gaining promise. Termed cancer immunotherapy, researchers have discovered ways to bolster the immune system to recognize and kill cancer cells.

“I caught the travel bug as a college freshman. There was an opportunity to volunteer over the summer break. I had rarely traveled and thought I couldn't pass on the opportunity.

“Every time I place an intrauterine device I feel like Margaret Sanger!” Lisa DiGiorgio-Haag exclaimed. DiGiorgio-Haag has been a nurse practitioner at UCSF Student Health for 24 years and specializes in women’s health. She completed her Bachelor of Science in Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania, and went on to earn a Master of Science in Nursing and certification eligibility as a Family Nurse Practitioner from UCSF. It was during her graduate studies that DiGiorgio-Haag decided to focus on women’s health, despite being discouraged to do so.

If you were to ride the D.C. metro the morning after the election, you would have been overwhelmed with a tense, eerie silence that pervaded the mood of the town.

This type of distress and strong emotion permeated throughout the country.

"I have always been concerned about the harms of secondhand smoke, especially since I was diagnosed with asthma at a young age.