“Singing has been a part of my life for as long as I can remember. I grew up in a really musical family, played classical guitar and piano through grade school, and discovered a love for a cappella singing as an undergrad student.

Students, faculty and the administration at UCSF have unified in taking steps to fight discrimination and support undocumented students in the wake of Donald Trump’s election.

“It is my ambition to say in 10 sentences what others say in a whole book.” If his quotability is any indication, Friedrich Nietzsche arguably succeeded in his goal. While the average UCSF graduate student won’t likely find their thesis work paralleling the work of Nietzsche too directly, there is one such occasion for students to master the art of brevity so championed by the 19th century philosopher.
“Mr. Hayward is a 45-year-old African-American male with hypertension who presents with dyspnea on exertion…” Patient narratives like the one above traditionally open with a mention of race. That has begun to change, however, as UCSF and peer institutions move to discourage this practice—in some cases as early as in the first months of medical school.
Waking to a different country, alternate universe. Feeling that the values I was raised with have been demolished. Questioning whether equality, truth, knowledge, justice, or respect are held in any regard by the citizens of this country. I am terrified, sad, angry, ashamed. I go through the day feeling emotions sway, my resolve is tested, my strength is being tested, my conviction is being tested.

“I am a cancer mom. Once a cancer mom, always a cancer mom. I'm also a registered nurse and have worked in the emergency department (including a pediatric trauma center) and intensive care for over 15 years.

The Do No Harm Coalition views the 2016 Presidential Election of Donald Trump as a heavy reminder that illness, injustice and mistrust exists within the fabric of our society.

With activities ranging from NASA’s miniature particle accelerator to Chevron’s anatomy of a baseball, thousands of awestruck kids enjoyed hands-on scientific experiments at AT&T Park on Nov.

In the aftermath of the election, the past several days have been difficult for me. As a woman and a scientist with a set of Mexican grandparents, the results of this election have made me incredibly emotional — especially when I start thinking about how this feels for all of my fellow Americans who are women or people of color or immigrants or non-Christians or LGBTQIA or refugees or veterans or disabled individuals or any other group explicitly victimized (crying babies at rallies?) by the President-Elect during his campaign.

I woke up at 6:40 in the morning after a night of fitful sleep. Bleary-eyed, I grabbed my phone off my nightstand and refreshed the election coverage I had been following with great difficulty the night before, but the outcome hadn’t changed.