In human cells, three billion base pairs arrange themselves into sequences of As, Ts, Gs, and Cs to form genes. However, despite its large size, only 1% to 2% of the human genome is actually organized into genes. So, what does the remaining, mysterious, 98% of the human genome do?
Arguably the most contentious issue facing politicians is abortion, but when a candidate uses shocking and misleading language to debate the matter, it's the patient who suffers. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump used some of the most graphic terms ever heard by a presidential nominee when asked about the issue of abortion during the third presidential debate in October.

“I am a fairly non-traditional pharmacy student. I started pursuing an entirely different field, my husband and son are back in Southern California, I am older.

Quick, what does a scientist look like? Picture it in your mind — don’t overthink it. What are they wearing? What's their gender? The color of their skin? If you aren’t all that happy with what popped into your head, it’s understandable.

This election cycle, the top of the ticket is in the spotlight, and for good reason. However, California voters will also be considering a sizeable list of ballot propositions. Some of this year’s ballot measures address pressing public health issues like prescription drug prices, funding for healthcare programs, legalizing marijuana, tobacco taxes, and even the adult film industry. To help inform the UCSF community, the Health Policy Interest Group hosted a Know Your Ballot event featuring lively discussion and nonpartisan presentations on selected state and city-level ballot measures.
UCSF students and health care workers are campaigning to provide a free medical clinic for Native Americans facing violence while protesting a proposed oil pipeline in North Dakota. “Upon invitation by the Standing Rock Nation, we are partnering with tribal leadership and local health workers to provide health care at a time where many people have limited access to health care due to geographic location, limited resources at local hospitals, and are subject to a strong police presence in the area.”

“I grew up all over the world, but I’ve somehow always lived in the Bay Area on and off. My first exposure to nursing was at a high school career fair; I then decided to shadow different nursing professions.

“If someone told my 7th grade self, who would regularly puke in the school bathroom between classes, that I would someday be a student at a health professional school, there’s absolutely no way I would have believed them.” As a UCSF student who struggled with anorexia and anxiety disorder, “Taylor” (the student’s name has been changed for privacy) is one of many at UCSF who identify as having a disability.
This year, UCSF introduced Bridges, a new curriculum for first year medical students. The new curriculum involves 1.5 preclinical years instead of two, and features three major components: Foundational Sciences (FS), Core Inquiry Curriculum (CIC), and Clinical Microsystems Clerkship (CMC). With so many moving parts, trying to understand each piece is a challenge even for the first year medical students experiencing the new curriculum. Synapse’s newest column, Crossing Bridges, provides an insider view from five first year medical students as they break down the new curriculum’s different components.

“I've never made a penny being a doctor, so that makes it not a job. My sense of a doctor is that one is a presence caring for health. So I'm never not a doctor. People call me from all over the world who are hurting, and I care for them.