“I grew up all over the world, but I’ve somehow always lived in the Bay Area on and off. My first exposure to nursing was at a high school career fair; I then decided to shadow different nursing professions.

“If someone told my 7th grade self, who would regularly puke in the school bathroom between classes, that I would someday be a student at a health professional school, there’s absolutely no way I would have believed them.” As a UCSF student who struggled with anorexia and anxiety disorder, “Taylor” (the student’s name has been changed for privacy) is one of many at UCSF who identify as having a disability.
This year, UCSF introduced Bridges, a new curriculum for first year medical students. The new curriculum involves 1.5 preclinical years instead of two, and features three major components: Foundational Sciences (FS), Core Inquiry Curriculum (CIC), and Clinical Microsystems Clerkship (CMC). With so many moving parts, trying to understand each piece is a challenge even for the first year medical students experiencing the new curriculum. Synapse’s newest column, Crossing Bridges, provides an insider view from five first year medical students as they break down the new curriculum’s different components.

“I've never made a penny being a doctor, so that makes it not a job. My sense of a doctor is that one is a presence caring for health. So I'm never not a doctor. People call me from all over the world who are hurting, and I care for them.

With the successful creation of DNA vaccines that elicited immune protection from Zika infection, hope is on the rise in the fight against this awful virus.
Marybeth Gasman, in a recent article for the Washington Post, describes obstacles many professionals of color, mainly African Americans, face when applying for faculty positions in the U.S. Sadly, this article points out how our current higher education system is far from reaching equity. Nevertheless, Gasman acknowledges that “ensuring that African Americans have opportunity and equity means interacting with them daily, having to listen their voices and perspective,” and this holds true for all minority groups.
By Ray
When nature calls, you go. There are no gender lines, arbitrary rooms and designated stalls. When your bowels are moving, sweat is dripping and the tensions are tight as can be, regardless of what sign that bathroom has up, you go. Nature happened to call really strongly upon my friend one day while we were working through the late night in the SimLab Clinics and to her terror, the women’s restroom was undergoing a cleaning. So like any normal person with an exploding bladder, she went into the men’s.

Have you ever wondered how plants are turned into biofuels, or how astronomers search for extraterrestrial life? If you’re anything like me, your inner 10-year old is dancing in circles at the very hint of such exploration.

This election cycle has been a ride, hasn’t it? Donald Trump is grabbing everything but Republican endorsements, Hillary Clinton is proving that the permanent problems are the ones you delete, Gary Johnson is still figuring out what Aleppo is, and Jill Stein – well, her lack of media attention has probably bolstered her credibility more than anything.

“Finishing my summer dental research project feels so good! While I am the editor-in-chief for the dental research newsletter and have years of research experience under my belt, I still don’t feel like a confident researcher.