In the aftermath of the election, the past several days have been difficult for me. As a woman and a scientist with a set of Mexican grandparents, the results of this election have made me incredibly emotional — especially when I start thinking about how this feels for all of my fellow Americans who are women or people of color or immigrants or non-Christians or LGBTQIA or refugees or veterans or disabled individuals or any other group explicitly victimized (crying babies at rallies?) by the President-Elect during his campaign.

I woke up at 6:40 in the morning after a night of fitful sleep. Bleary-eyed, I grabbed my phone off my nightstand and refreshed the election coverage I had been following with great difficulty the night before, but the outcome hadn’t changed.

By Ray
Given the recent events surrounding the presidential election, I find it hard to scribble about the topic I originally had intended to delve into: love. I mean, in such a packed city, how do I find so many single people who just can’t find the one to swipe right? I planned to make some profound statement about our hopeless yearning for romance through a screen, and just the general lack of intrigue happening on campus — but in light of what has happened, I think the real question is where is the love?

“For me, 2016 has been a year of success accompanied by huge changes. This is my first time living in a new city with new people, opportunities, and responsibilities.

An unexpected advantage of introducing a new curriculum has been the fervent solicitation of student feedback. Through a renewed emphasis on feedback and change, first-year students will not only cross Bridges, we will help build it.

It is 4 a.m. in San Francisco.

Deep night overwhelms the emptiness.

I would like to stay in this dark forever.

I feel safe here —

no one knows my skin,

no one knows my religion,

In human cells, three billion base pairs arrange themselves into sequences of As, Ts, Gs, and Cs to form genes. However, despite its large size, only 1% to 2% of the human genome is actually organized into genes. So, what does the remaining, mysterious, 98% of the human genome do?
Arguably the most contentious issue facing politicians is abortion, but when a candidate uses shocking and misleading language to debate the matter, it's the patient who suffers. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump used some of the most graphic terms ever heard by a presidential nominee when asked about the issue of abortion during the third presidential debate in October.

“I am a fairly non-traditional pharmacy student. I started pursuing an entirely different field, my husband and son are back in Southern California, I am older.

Quick, what does a scientist look like? Picture it in your mind — don’t overthink it. What are they wearing? What's their gender? The color of their skin? If you aren’t all that happy with what popped into your head, it’s understandable.