One by one, from a lone chair atop a brightly lit stage, students and staff opened up about their journeys of coming out to the world. On Oct. 12, members of UCSF’s LGBTQ community came together for the 2nd Annual Coming Out Monologues, where brave voices volunteered to tell their stories. Hot on the heels of National Coming Out Day, the Monologues represented a night of unity for the queer community, where we could be vulnerable and discover how different yet relatable many of our experiences are. Between inspirational stories, videos of the OUTlist played where, similar to this event, members of the UCSF queer community spoke on their lived-in experiences.
[This story was originally published in Synapse - The UCSF student newspaper, Volume 32, Number 7, 22 October, 1987] A mysterious episode that may have involved gross radiation overexposures to three UCSF workers appears to be ending unresolved. In September EHS officials received a startling notification from Radiation Detection Company, the company that reads all radiation monitoring badges for campus employees.
​This year’s Nobel Prize winners in medicine were three unique scientists who deconstructed how cells keep time. On Oct. 2, the Nobel Assembly awarded its 2017 Prize in Physiology or Medicine to Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael W. Young “for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling circadian rhythms.” The foundations these men laid in the biology of timekeeping established greater understanding of the connection between our genetic material and the Earth’s daily rotation.
[Originally published in Synapse - The UCSF student newspaper, Volume 17, Number 3, 20 October 1972.] The campus is about to lose one of its oldest structures. A seismic study done during the summer at the Chancellor's request resulted in the finding that the 610 Parnassus Residence Hall "would not perform satisfactorily in even a modest earthquake."

“I’m from the east coast and never ever in my dreams thought I’d come out here. My whole immediate family is in New England. We could talk to each other out the window if we want to. My mom said, ‘don’t ever look at the Pacific.

“Before beginning my path toward dentistry I lived in New York City. My friend and her coworker were visiting from Arizona and we met up for drinks. Happy hour turned into ‘regular hour,’ which then turned into a week of showing off the city.

[Originally published in Synapse, Volume 27, Number 6, 14 October 1982] Medical students at UCSF who failed part I of the national medical board exam have filed a formal grievance with Acting Dean Robert Crede — protesting a school policy which could hold them back from entering third-year clinical clerkships.
Next time you’re on a hike in a Redwood forest, running along Ocean Beach simply packed into a Muni car during your morning commute, spare a thought for the embryo. Where does it come from and what does it become?
Scientists are making discoveries that give hope to global improvements in healthy pregnancies. The immune system is naturally primed to prevent invaders from thriving in the human body. Pregnancy presents an interesting challenge where immunity must balance defense and fetal tolerance — the fetus is foreign but must thrive. A mother reconfigures her own own defense system, constantly, as the fetus grows and changes.
Ironically, the time we spend training to help people and advance science cuts into the time we could spend with the ones we love the most. Constantly pushing yourself to exhaustion doesn’t just impact you. When you break, the ones you love the most are left to pick up the pieces, and it’s just not fair to them.