As your executive vice chancellor and provost, I facilitated the annual Chancellor’s Leadership Diversity Forum on April 27. During the Q&A, Engie Salama, second-year School of Pharmacy student, demonstrated her courage by describing the challenges she and others face in the rigorous learning environment at UCSF, the mental health consequences, and the question of what more could be done to provide support. Aaron Mattingly’s opinion piece, “Leadership or Lip Service,” in Synapse from two weeks ago, describes his reaction to my response, which I understand.
Rebekka Baiser

“I love running around with kids because I feel free to be the goofy person that I am. And as a goofy person, science is easier to learn in an interactive and silly way.

In a “Faculty-Student Meet and Greet” event hosted by UCSF’s Women in Life Sciences group, I was inspired by Carol Gross’s perspective towards participating in efforts to safeguard ideals in our community, especially those associated with promoting diversity. In her opinion when people have persevered for change, some change has followed. It hasn’t been easy. But voices make a difference. Then, why should it be different this time?
Image of a thumbs down.

On Thursday April 27 UCSF held the 10th Annual Chancellor’s Leadership Forum on Diversity and Inclusion, but I was not entirely convinced that all of the leadership were there to listen. In fact, one exchange in particular told me that when it comes to diversity at UCSF, lip service sometimes takes precedence over action.

Image of a handheld glucometer, continuous glucose monitor, and insulin pump.

Electronic monitoring and storing of health data is all of the rage right now. Many of us track the number of steps we take with our mobile phones or smart watches, log food consumption, and measure our heart rate. But would you trust a mobile health app to decide when you should receive a life saving, but in some cases, life threatening, drug? For diabetics, this possibility is approaching reality.

Iva Petrovchich

“If I wasn't going to be an oncology nurse practitioner, I would absolutely run a bakery. I like to shake any extra clinical energy off by making ice cream, cheese, cream puffs, you name it. There's something joyful about creating something with your hands, and getting to share it with someone you love.

Image of Dr. Robert Reich at a podium.

Professor Robert Reich believes that the greatest current threat to our democracy is not our president, not congressmen, and not the bureaucracy of our political system. It is that Americans have lost faith in the strength of their country’s democratic institutions.

Dr. Haile Debas launches the teach-in with a video presentation in May 2007.

Capping off several weeks of intense debate and deliberation in the House and Senate over continued funding for the war and increasing reports of civilian and military casualties, the UCSF campus bore witness to a teach-in entitled "The Health Effects of the Iraq War," that sought to reconcile the conflict's daily occurrences with the state of the American economy and healthcare and research infrastructures through a series of detailed presentations and speeches.

March 1991 image of Rodney King beating.

After two days of rioting in Los Angeles in response to the Rodney King beating verdict —and a night of unrest in San Francisco in which a curfew and local state of emergency was declared by Mayor Frank Jordan —members of the campus community voiced their reactions at a standing-room only meeting in Cole Hall on Frida, May 1, 1992.

Students participate in March for Science in Washington, DC.

On a rainy Saturday in Washington DC, I joined 40,000 scientists from all academic disciplines gathered to March for Science. This was one of over 600 satellite marches across the world spanning all seven continents. The marches drew hundreds of thousands of people out to make our voices heard. We marched to end the use of “alternative facts.” We marched to encourage diversity in science. We marched to display the importance of immigrants to the scientific community. And most prominently, we marched for the future of science.