Image of Dr. Robert Reich at a podium.

Professor Robert Reich believes that the greatest current threat to our democracy is not our president, not congressmen, and not the bureaucracy of our political system. It is that Americans have lost faith in the strength of their country’s democratic institutions.

Dr. Haile Debas launches the teach-in with a video presentation in May 2007.

Capping off several weeks of intense debate and deliberation in the House and Senate over continued funding for the war and increasing reports of civilian and military casualties, the UCSF campus bore witness to a teach-in entitled "The Health Effects of the Iraq War," that sought to reconcile the conflict's daily occurrences with the state of the American economy and healthcare and research infrastructures through a series of detailed presentations and speeches.

March 1991 image of Rodney King beating.

After two days of rioting in Los Angeles in response to the Rodney King beating verdict —and a night of unrest in San Francisco in which a curfew and local state of emergency was declared by Mayor Frank Jordan —members of the campus community voiced their reactions at a standing-room only meeting in Cole Hall on Frida, May 1, 1992.

Students participate in March for Science in Washington, DC.

On a rainy Saturday in Washington DC, I joined 40,000 scientists from all academic disciplines gathered to March for Science. This was one of over 600 satellite marches across the world spanning all seven continents. The marches drew hundreds of thousands of people out to make our voices heard. We marched to end the use of “alternative facts.” We marched to encourage diversity in science. We marched to display the importance of immigrants to the scientific community. And most prominently, we marched for the future of science.

UCSF students rally in Washington DC in front of the White House during the March for Science gathering.

“Is the March for Science political?” my friend asked me a week before the march. “Why are you doing it?” I thought about these two questions leading up to the UCSF Stand Up for Science Rally and March for Science, which I participated in along with hundreds of UCSF students, postdocs, faculty, staff and community.

Two faculty members shared their respective career paths and experiences as academic scientists of diverse backgrounds during an April 19 event hosted by Scientists 4 Diversity (S4D), an event attended by UCSF students, postdocs, and employees.

Scientists know that race is based solely on subjective evaluation of physical traits. In the genes, race cannot be discerned. Scientists are uniquely qualified to speak with authority on the issue — or rather non-issue — of race.

Photo of Ezekiel Adigun First Year, School of Medicine

“The show ‘So You Think You Can Dance’ dramatically altered the course of my life. I remember at 12 years old being so enamored with the amazing dance moves, cool costumes, and perfect facial expressions.

Startup culture is infectious in the Bay Area, and there's no better incubator than UCSF. Indeed, students here have unbounded access to entrepreneurial resources. Highlights from this year include the I am a UC Entrepreneur! initiative by President Janet Napolitano, the Startup 101 Pitch Night with Chancellor Sam Hawgood, and the Startup Connection mixer with local venture capitalists. For the School of Medicine Bridges curriculum, startup season is also year-round. UCSF alumnus and biotechnology entrepreneur Dr. David Hung gave a lecture to first-year medical students last winter, and our Health and Society block featured small groups on leadership skills and health IT this spring.
Embryo cells viewed under a microscope.

A couple sits close, intently studying a dossier. On the dossier is a list starting with Embryo #1.