UCSF students rally in Washington DC in front of the White House during the March for Science gathering.

“Is the March for Science political?” my friend asked me a week before the march. “Why are you doing it?” I thought about these two questions leading up to the UCSF Stand Up for Science Rally and March for Science, which I participated in along with hundreds of UCSF students, postdocs, faculty, staff and community.

Two faculty members shared their respective career paths and experiences as academic scientists of diverse backgrounds during an April 19 event hosted by Scientists 4 Diversity (S4D), an event attended by UCSF students, postdocs, and employees.

Scientists know that race is based solely on subjective evaluation of physical traits. In the genes, race cannot be discerned. Scientists are uniquely qualified to speak with authority on the issue — or rather non-issue — of race.

Photo of Ezekiel Adigun First Year, School of Medicine

“The show ‘So You Think You Can Dance’ dramatically altered the course of my life. I remember at 12 years old being so enamored with the amazing dance moves, cool costumes, and perfect facial expressions.

Startup culture is infectious in the Bay Area, and there's no better incubator than UCSF. Indeed, students here have unbounded access to entrepreneurial resources. Highlights from this year include the I am a UC Entrepreneur! initiative by President Janet Napolitano, the Startup 101 Pitch Night with Chancellor Sam Hawgood, and the Startup Connection mixer with local venture capitalists. For the School of Medicine Bridges curriculum, startup season is also year-round. UCSF alumnus and biotechnology entrepreneur Dr. David Hung gave a lecture to first-year medical students last winter, and our Health and Society block featured small groups on leadership skills and health IT this spring.
Embryo cells viewed under a microscope.

A couple sits close, intently studying a dossier. On the dossier is a list starting with Embryo #1.

Amused, I clicked the hashtag #menaresofragile and learned that a clinical trial for TU NET-EN, an injectable male contraceptive, had been cancelled due to “intolerable side effects.” As I looked around the Internet that day, I saw that the hashtag reflected widespread outrage among women: we have had to stomach the unpleasant side effects of hormonal contraceptives for decades, and now an entire study is down the tubes because men can’t handle a little bit of acne?
Photo of Dr. Chris Lin
“I’m a father of three children and it is inherent to want to share one’s experience and knowledge to the next generation. It would be my dream for one of my children to choose dentistry as their career, but that would be my desire and not theirs. I consider all of my dental students as my sons and daughters and I enjoy sharing my life experience with all of them. Currently, I teach in the Simulation Lab with D1 and D2 students and the externs that select my site in my community clinic. I get the best of both worlds.”
A circle of hands meet at a center point.
By Ray

In college, I used to have this one thought every finals week after weekends of pushing back studying while going to bars and binging on TV shows, only to finally cram in the library and study like a life depended on it.

HIV rates are declining as a whole among men who have sex with men, but rates aren’t decreasing for Black and Latino populations. The goal is Getting to Zero, but are the institutions dedicated to the cause actually dedicated to these groups?