Opinion

A circle of hands meet at a center point.
By Ray

In college, I used to have this one thought every finals week after weekends of pushing back studying while going to bars and binging on TV shows, only to finally cram in the library and study like a life depended on it.

HIV rates are declining as a whole among men who have sex with men, but rates aren’t decreasing for Black and Latino populations. The goal is Getting to Zero, but are the institutions dedicated to the cause actually dedicated to these groups?

I am a Christian. And I am gay. These two factions of my life have clashed and pulled me in opposite directions my whole life. Among my church family, I heard words like abomination, disgusting, unnatural. Among my LGBTQ family, I heard words like bigotry, narrow-minded, unloving. My choices? Go to hell or live denying myself of love. This rhetoric left me so suffocated, to the point that I actually played with the notion of an irreversible “easy way out” in college. So naturally, I moved to San Francisco.

The future of medicine is prevention. And yet, like so many organizations so excited about measurable outcomes that they’ve forgotten the purpose of medicine and public health policy — to heal and help self and community resilience — UCSF is considering axing its 19-years-running Chancellor’s Concert Series. Citing lackluster attendance and other priorities, organizers announced a possible end to the series during the March 2 concert at Cole Hall. The office of Campus Life Services is missing the forest of health through the trees of short-term thinking.

“Natural selection making 'education genes' rarer.” “Intelligence is being bred out of the gene pool.” Can you recognize which of these headlines is realistic or exaggerated? The answer is that each is a little of both — and they’re reflective of a disturbing trend. These and other current headlines are skewing real science.

“Every time I place an intrauterine device I feel like Margaret Sanger!” Lisa DiGiorgio-Haag exclaimed. DiGiorgio-Haag has been a nurse practitioner at UCSF Student Health for 24 years and specializes in women’s health. She completed her Bachelor of Science in Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania, and went on to earn a Master of Science in Nursing and certification eligibility as a Family Nurse Practitioner from UCSF. It was during her graduate studies that DiGiorgio-Haag decided to focus on women’s health, despite being discouraged to do so.

As future medical professionals, it is imperative that we stay informed of the rapidly changing landscape of medical aid in zones of conflict. The intentional targeting of health care workers and patients in medical settings can in no way become the new-normal. While speaking out against these issues is a first step, much more needs to be done on both a national and international level to effect sustainable change.

Waking to a different country, alternate universe. Feeling that the values I was raised with have been demolished. Questioning whether equality, truth, knowledge, justice, or respect are held in any regard by the citizens of this country. I am terrified, sad, angry, ashamed. I go through the day feeling emotions sway, my resolve is tested, my strength is being tested, my conviction is being tested.

The Do No Harm Coalition views the 2016 Presidential Election of Donald Trump as a heavy reminder that illness, injustice and mistrust exists within the fabric of our society.

In the aftermath of the election, the past several days have been difficult for me. As a woman and a scientist with a set of Mexican grandparents, the results of this election have made me incredibly emotional — especially when I start thinking about how this feels for all of my fellow Americans who are women or people of color or immigrants or non-Christians or LGBTQIA or refugees or veterans or disabled individuals or any other group explicitly victimized (crying babies at rallies?) by the President-Elect during his campaign.