Opinion

Cape Canaveral, Fla.

This is the first installment of a column to which I will return periodically over the next few years, with learning points I come upon in my own training or in conversation with my clinical mentors.

Picture of white and brown turkey

With November right around the corner, students are beginning to buy their tickets to fly home for the Thanksgiving holiday.

I am a student in the School of Medicine, in the middle of my first year now. I love school, I love studying and learning, and I love being here. But I get so insecure when I realize that I can’t really retain everything I am supposed to be reading. I have fallen so behind in my studying, and I am so nervous about our exams. We are supposed to learn so much about things I have never heard of (I was not a science major in college). I don’t know if I can cut it. How am I ever going to become a good doctor if I can’t remember all this important material? Please help.

Third-year medical students at UCSF recently spent a week discussing challenging cases they had encountered during their first six months in clinical training.

There are many reasons to breastfeed, and it’s likely that most pregnant women have heard them all … over and over again.

Dear Editor,

Got a long incubation time to kill? Waiting for your cells to spin? Bored in between classes? In class?  

In mid-February, we published an article in the Synapse in the shadow of the looming Budget Control Act (BCA), more commonly known as sequestration or “the sequester.” We expressed the  hope then that policy makers in Washington, D.C., wo

As a grad student, I feel like I’ve spent the past three years of my life running in place. I haven’t had any professional or personal successes: no paper, no graduation in sight, no relationship, and I feel left out of life. It seems like everyone around me has something to be congratulated about, and I’m coming to resent it. How can I be happier for my friends when good things happen to them without just being angry and jealous?