Opinion

When it comes to baby food, I married a complete and total hippie, although this really only applies to our baby’s food, and not at all to what we, as parents, consume.

black and white figure of woman doctor in white coat holding child
By Anonymous (not verified)

There’s an National Public Radio podcast called Freakonomics Radio that I really enjoy listening to while doing cell culture.

Being in grad school here is putting a horrible crimp in my family life. I have a wife and two young kids, and all my time spent in the lab doing research is just killing me. I can't find the energy to be fully present with my wife or with my kids. I get home tired and frustrated, and even though I tell myself on the ride home my new mantra: "Tonight, I will be fully present," I can't seem do it.

Three years ago I was experiencing almost daily rocket attacks on our compound in Baghdad, Iraq. This Veterans’ Day, I found myself barricaded behind a mountain of books and notes studying for my nursing med-surg exam.

Cape Canaveral, Fla.

This is the first installment of a column to which I will return periodically over the next few years, with learning points I come upon in my own training or in conversation with my clinical mentors.

Picture of white and brown turkey

With November right around the corner, students are beginning to buy their tickets to fly home for the Thanksgiving holiday.

I am a student in the School of Medicine, in the middle of my first year now. I love school, I love studying and learning, and I love being here. But I get so insecure when I realize that I can’t really retain everything I am supposed to be reading. I have fallen so behind in my studying, and I am so nervous about our exams. We are supposed to learn so much about things I have never heard of (I was not a science major in college). I don’t know if I can cut it. How am I ever going to become a good doctor if I can’t remember all this important material? Please help.

Third-year medical students at UCSF recently spent a week discussing challenging cases they had encountered during their first six months in clinical training.

There are many reasons to breastfeed, and it’s likely that most pregnant women have heard them all … over and over again.