Science

The universe, we are told by astronomers, is made up mostly of dark matter. The normal matter that every one of us has seen or touched here on Earth, in space, or through our telescopes is but a tiny fraction of the whole.

Prioritization is an important skill in life, ensuring that the most important tasks are completed first -- turns out the body prioritizes immune response over emotional health.

Dr. Judith Campisi envisions a future where treatments would destroy cells that drive aging, thus lengthening our healthspan. Campisi delivered a seminar at UCSF on Oct. 24 describing her theory of senescent cell-driven aging.
Cancer is an ever-present scourge in modern society. More than 1.6 million Americans were diagnosed with cancer in 2016, and it is estimated to cost American citizens more than $156 billion annually by 2020. Understanding how a tumor changes through time and recurs after surgery or treatment, as well as what types of drugs best kill the tumor, are essential for improving human cancer therapies. Frequently, mouse models of cancer are used to study the disease and evaluate possible therapeutics, but a recent study from the Broad Institute Cancer Program demonstrates that mouse models do not represent human tumor evolution as well as thought, and these models may yield false-positive drug responses.
Next time you’re on a hike in a Redwood forest, running along Ocean Beach simply packed into a Muni car during your morning commute, spare a thought for the embryo. Where does it come from and what does it become?
Scientists are making discoveries that give hope to global improvements in healthy pregnancies. The immune system is naturally primed to prevent invaders from thriving in the human body. Pregnancy presents an interesting challenge where immunity must balance defense and fetal tolerance — the fetus is foreign but must thrive. A mother reconfigures her own own defense system, constantly, as the fetus grows and changes.
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is picture.

The UC Board of Regents renewed five-year contracts for two highly controversial nuclear weapons laboratories on Sept. 18, 1987.

If you peer closely at a drop of pond water with a microscope, what do you think you’ll see? If your answer is an amorphous amoeba, or perhaps a furry paramecium, you’re correct.

Image of a handheld glucometer, continuous glucose monitor, and insulin pump.

Electronic monitoring and storing of health data is all of the rage right now. Many of us track the number of steps we take with our mobile phones or smart watches, log food consumption, and measure our heart rate. But would you trust a mobile health app to decide when you should receive a life saving, but in some cases, life threatening, drug? For diabetics, this possibility is approaching reality.

Students participate in March for Science in Washington, DC.

On a rainy Saturday in Washington DC, I joined 40,000 scientists from all academic disciplines gathered to March for Science. This was one of over 600 satellite marches across the world spanning all seven continents. The marches drew hundreds of thousands of people out to make our voices heard. We marched to end the use of “alternative facts.” We marched to encourage diversity in science. We marched to display the importance of immigrants to the scientific community. And most prominently, we marched for the future of science.