News

Stories of sexual assault are rampant in the news today. From Hollywood producers and radio hosts to politicians and news reporters, it is clear that no field is immune to violations of trust. The chain of events may seem clear for those who have not experienced emotional, physical, or sexual abuse. A betrayal occurs, a victim reports that betrayal, and the perpetrator is punished. However, these betrayals and their underlying psychology are far more complex.

Over the last month or so we’ve witnessed a wave of sexual harassment cases popping up in the media and on social media.

The president-elect of the California Dental Association (CDA) gave an inspiring talk on Nov. 9 on the power of advocacy and the importance of organized dentistry to UCSF students.

[Originally published in Synapse - The UCSF student newspaper, Nov. 5, 1987]

UCSF medical school is the top-ranked public medical school in the United States, according to a U.S. News and World Report survey of medical school deans.

​Cole Hall and Millberry Union were packed on Oct. 12 as the UCSF School of Dentistry celebrated its 14th Research and Clinical Excellence Day. Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost Daniel Lowenstein made a case for healthcare researchers’ importance on par with with clinicians. Namely, to answer the questions that have yet to be answered. There remains a tremendous amount that we do not understand about the needs of our patients, he said, which is what necessitates continued discovery and innovation.
[This story was originally published in Synapse - The UCSF student newspaper, Volume 32, Number 7, 22 October, 1987] A mysterious episode that may have involved gross radiation overexposures to three UCSF workers appears to be ending unresolved. In September EHS officials received a startling notification from Radiation Detection Company, the company that reads all radiation monitoring badges for campus employees.
​This year’s Nobel Prize winners in medicine were three unique scientists who deconstructed how cells keep time. On Oct. 2, the Nobel Assembly awarded its 2017 Prize in Physiology or Medicine to Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael W. Young “for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling circadian rhythms.” The foundations these men laid in the biology of timekeeping established greater understanding of the connection between our genetic material and the Earth’s daily rotation.
[Originally published in Synapse - The UCSF student newspaper, Volume 17, Number 3, 20 October 1972.] The campus is about to lose one of its oldest structures. A seismic study done during the summer at the Chancellor's request resulted in the finding that the 610 Parnassus Residence Hall "would not perform satisfactorily in even a modest earthquake."

For years we have known that spaceflight causes immune dysfunction, weakening the human body’s ability to fight off even the common cold.

In April, the Associated Students of the Graduate Division (ASGD) developed and administered a survey to get at this question.