Science

As humanity’s population swells, the environmental conservation movement in the 21st century is increasingly dependent on our ability to develop more efficient techniques in food production.

Have you ever stood in a high place and felt the instinctive drive to step back and find safety? Researchers studying the brains of mice may have found the neurons responsible for such deep-seated anxieties.

UC San Francisco scientists have invented a technique that lets them precisely and reversibly disrupt the action of specific cellular proteins at a microscopic scale by making them split apart when illuminated with blue light.

[Originally published in Synapse - The UCSF student newspaper, Jan. 16, 1959]

In 2015, a seven-year old boy in Germany lost 60% of his skin due to a genetic disorder. Miraculously, after all conventional treatments had failed and he was nearing death, engineered skin cells were able to promote regrowth of his skin.

Have you ever stopped and wondered how much it costs UCSF each year for all those articles you read? The UCSF library spends approximately 85% of their collections budget, just to maintain their current subscription load.

The universe, we are told by astronomers, is made up mostly of dark matter. The normal matter that every one of us has seen or touched here on Earth, in space, or through our telescopes is but a tiny fraction of the whole.

Prioritization is an important skill in life, ensuring that the most important tasks are completed first -- turns out the body prioritizes immune response over emotional health.

Dr. Judith Campisi envisions a future where treatments would destroy cells that drive aging, thus lengthening our healthspan. Campisi delivered a seminar at UCSF on Oct. 24 describing her theory of senescent cell-driven aging.
Cancer is an ever-present scourge in modern society. More than 1.6 million Americans were diagnosed with cancer in 2016, and it is estimated to cost American citizens more than $156 billion annually by 2020. Understanding how a tumor changes through time and recurs after surgery or treatment, as well as what types of drugs best kill the tumor, are essential for improving human cancer therapies. Frequently, mouse models of cancer are used to study the disease and evaluate possible therapeutics, but a recent study from the Broad Institute Cancer Program demonstrates that mouse models do not represent human tumor evolution as well as thought, and these models may yield false-positive drug responses.