Student Life

“I’m from the east coast and never ever in my dreams thought I’d come out here. My whole immediate family is in New England. We could talk to each other out the window if we want to. My mom said, ‘don’t ever look at the Pacific.

“Before beginning my path toward dentistry I lived in New York City. My friend and her coworker were visiting from Arizona and we met up for drinks. Happy hour turned into ‘regular hour,’ which then turned into a week of showing off the city.

“This past summer, my classmate, Tammy McCall, and I had the exciting opportunity to complete our health policy internship in Norway from June through August.

“I love to escape the masses, put on a backpack and explore the mountains, or pick up and move to a new place where I don’t know a soul. It’s thrilling to feel so vulnerable.

“I find that it’s hard to be sure about many things, and I try to stay open so I can move forward as things change. At the same time, there are so many things to be sure of. I’m sure that a positive attitude goes a long way.

“Being forced to resign from my 11-year gymnastics career was incredibly life changing for better and for worse. I had countless discussions with healthcare providers telling me that my physical abilities would be limited as I had a high risk for trauma. However, I refused to acknowledge the limitations that were set before me.
As your executive vice chancellor and provost, I facilitated the annual Chancellor’s Leadership Diversity Forum on April 27. During the Q&A, Engie Salama, second-year School of Pharmacy student, demonstrated her courage by describing the challenges she and others face in the rigorous learning environment at UCSF, the mental health consequences, and the question of what more could be done to provide support. Aaron Mattingly’s opinion piece, “Leadership or Lip Service,” in Synapse from two weeks ago, describes his reaction to my response, which I understand.
Rebekka Baiser

“I love running around with kids because I feel free to be the goofy person that I am. And as a goofy person, science is easier to learn in an interactive and silly way.

Iva Petrovchich

“If I wasn't going to be an oncology nurse practitioner, I would absolutely run a bakery. I like to shake any extra clinical energy off by making ice cream, cheese, cream puffs, you name it. There's something joyful about creating something with your hands, and getting to share it with someone you love.

Dr. Haile Debas launches the teach-in with a video presentation in May 2007.

Capping off several weeks of intense debate and deliberation in the House and Senate over continued funding for the war and increasing reports of civilian and military casualties, the UCSF campus bore witness to a teach-in entitled "The Health Effects of the Iraq War," that sought to reconcile the conflict's daily occurrences with the state of the American economy and healthcare and research infrastructures through a series of detailed presentations and speeches.