Academic

[Originally published in Synapse, Volume 27, Number 6, 14 October 1982] Medical students at UCSF who failed part I of the national medical board exam have filed a formal grievance with Acting Dean Robert Crede — protesting a school policy which could hold them back from entering third-year clinical clerkships.
​What does it take to repair a broken heart? The Biomedical Sciences (BMS) graduate program at UCSF is instilling in us profound respect for medical practitioners, and the awareness that our daily work in the lab — monotonous hours of pipetting and repeatedly failing for the slim hope of success — eventually leads to better understanding, tools, and therapies to repair damage in the human body. To repair a broken heart, it takes doctors, researchers, and those bridging the gap between a test tube and human. Doctors and researchers alike share responsibility in building, supporting, and traversing this two-way bridge, from “bench to bedside” and back again, bringing better disease understanding to researchers and advances to therapies.
In a “Faculty-Student Meet and Greet” event hosted by UCSF’s Women in Life Sciences group, I was inspired by Carol Gross’s perspective towards participating in efforts to safeguard ideals in our community, especially those associated with promoting diversity. In her opinion when people have persevered for change, some change has followed. It hasn’t been easy. But voices make a difference. Then, why should it be different this time?

After seven weeks with my nose glued to the books learning as much as I could about the renal, endocrine, and gastrointestinal systems as well as nutrition (yes all that somehow fit into seven seemingly short weeks), I was ready for a break from t

Federal regulations are establishing stronger rights for career women in a variety of industries choosing to have babies, but these protections aren’t taking hold in the world of academia.

Women are notoriously underrepresented in the world of politics.

Furiously mincing the last of the onion and mushrooms, aggressively churning the lentil marinara to a thick paste, and scrambling to arrange the last of the garnishes before, "Time's up!

Wearing my white coat with my stethoscope hanging around my neck, I knock. I introduce myself while going through a checklist in my mind: say hello, ask how the patient would like to be addressed, start with the chief complaint.

“I lived through WWII. A little needle is not going to hurt me,” said Ms. X as I screened her for vaccination contraindications.

“You get how much time for cardio?” My friend, a third year medical student at a different school, was a bit surprised at the reduced amount of time we have dedicated to Cardiology in the new Bridges curriculum compared to his.