Storytelling Contest

Class play is a traditional aspect of med school at UCSF in which second year medical students put on a play of sorts for first year medical students that highlight salient and usually-funny aspects of medical school culture. The part of this year’s play that everyone still speaks about all the time is video footage of staged patient encounters.
Something I always admired about my dad is his ability to talk at length on any subject. Even as I pursued my PhD, he would call me up to talk about an article he read on CRISPR or cancer therapy or he would email me links to journal articles he had read.
When you’re five, everything’s a game. So why would this be any different? We were packing the last of our things to leave for good. I knew it, my mom knew it, and my uncle who was driving us to the airport knew it, but no one else knew, not even grandma.

Victoria Turner is the third place winner in the Synapse Storytelling Contest science writing category. Category judge, SF Chronicle science writer Erin Allday, said “Eye Contact Can Be Overwhelming was also a fascinating topic.

Editor's note: Kelly Crotty is the third place winner if the Synapse Storytelling Contest creative writing category.

Insectum is the second place winner in the Synapse Storytelling Contest's creative writing category. Comments from Synapse editor in chief and category judge Ariane Panzer: This poem had a consistent and very original theme.

Medical Students Make the Worst Patients: The Tragicomedy of an MS1 is the third place winner of the Synapse Storytelling Contest's personal essay category.

The Crucial Third is the second place winner of the Synapse Storytelling Contest's science writing category.

Thoughts from the Trauma Bay is the second place winner of the Synapse Storytelling Contest's personal essay category.

Editor's note: Newborn is Frank Chang's winning entry into the Synapse Storytelling Contest, photography category.