It was a crazy week for science. Naturally, there was a media firestorm following the inauguration of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States. To the surprise of many, science was at the forefront of several controversies. Scientists are now organizing a “March for Science,” inspired by the Women’s March on Washington.

By Ray

With a generous gift from the Helen Diller Foundation, UCSF has been able to finally answer the question, “What would you do if you won the lottery?”

“I go to sleep at 10 and wake up at 5. I try to eat healthy and to avoid eating out on the weekdays at all costs. People laugh at me saying, ‘girl relax, eat what you want, and just live life”.

In the fight against cancer, harnessing the natural defense mechanisms within the human body is gaining promise. Termed cancer immunotherapy, researchers have discovered ways to bolster the immune system to recognize and kill cancer cells.

“I caught the travel bug as a college freshman. There was an opportunity to volunteer over the summer break. I had rarely traveled and thought I couldn't pass on the opportunity.

“Every time I place an intrauterine device I feel like Margaret Sanger!” Lisa DiGiorgio-Haag exclaimed. DiGiorgio-Haag has been a nurse practitioner at UCSF Student Health for 24 years and specializes in women’s health. She completed her Bachelor of Science in Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania, and went on to earn a Master of Science in Nursing and certification eligibility as a Family Nurse Practitioner from UCSF. It was during her graduate studies that DiGiorgio-Haag decided to focus on women’s health, despite being discouraged to do so.

If you were to ride the D.C. metro the morning after the election, you would have been overwhelmed with a tense, eerie silence that pervaded the mood of the town.

This type of distress and strong emotion permeated throughout the country.

"I have always been concerned about the harms of secondhand smoke, especially since I was diagnosed with asthma at a young age.

“I lived through WWII. A little needle is not going to hurt me,” said Ms. X as I screened her for vaccination contraindications.

As future medical professionals, it is imperative that we stay informed of the rapidly changing landscape of medical aid in zones of conflict. The intentional targeting of health care workers and patients in medical settings can in no way become the new-normal. While speaking out against these issues is a first step, much more needs to be done on both a national and international level to effect sustainable change.