[Originally published in Synapse - The UCSF student newspaper Nov. 6, 1997] Last year I arranged to spend the month of July working at two small hospitals in San Miguel, a town of 50,000 people in the highlands of central Mexico. I went hoping to learn how Mexican-born patients, who would make up much of my practice here, are cared for at home for common problems like diabetes, hypertension and stroke.

"My whole body felt itchy, bumps were popping up on my back, my face swelled up like a hot air balloon… What could it be? On Jan. 21, 2017, and again on Feb. 4, 2017, I had anaphylactic allergic reactions and was driven to the ER by my fiancé.

“Ive always been fascinated with what people do for work. It’s what led me to explore a myriad of career options.

Dr. Judith Campisi envisions a future where treatments would destroy cells that drive aging, thus lengthening our healthspan. Campisi delivered a seminar at UCSF on Oct. 24 describing her theory of senescent cell-driven aging.
Cancer is an ever-present scourge in modern society. More than 1.6 million Americans were diagnosed with cancer in 2016, and it is estimated to cost American citizens more than $156 billion annually by 2020. Understanding how a tumor changes through time and recurs after surgery or treatment, as well as what types of drugs best kill the tumor, are essential for improving human cancer therapies. Frequently, mouse models of cancer are used to study the disease and evaluate possible therapeutics, but a recent study from the Broad Institute Cancer Program demonstrates that mouse models do not represent human tumor evolution as well as thought, and these models may yield false-positive drug responses.

“I have been a nurse for over 40 years and a nurse practitioner for more than 20. I am a double alumna of UCSF, MS 1996, PhD 2012, and have been teaching in the Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program since 2000.

[Originally published in Synapse - The UCSF student newspaper, Volume 40, Number 8, 26 October 1995] On Oct. 18 the U.S. House of Representatives voted 231-201 to cut $270 billion dollars from Medicare over the next seven years. The AMA endorsed the Medicare cuts after wresting numerous concessions, including the preservation of physician payments at their current levels, a $250,000 limit on malpractice awards, the relaxation of Medicare claims fraud laws, and an exemption from state laws which will allow physician provider-service networks to set up managed care plans and receive Medicare funds.

Now more than ever, it is critical that individuals join the #UCSFStandsUp movement to help shape public policy that enables us to continue advancing health.

​Cole Hall and Millberry Union were packed on Oct. 12 as the UCSF School of Dentistry celebrated its 14th Research and Clinical Excellence Day. Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost Daniel Lowenstein made a case for healthcare researchers’ importance on par with with clinicians. Namely, to answer the questions that have yet to be answered. There remains a tremendous amount that we do not understand about the needs of our patients, he said, which is what necessitates continued discovery and innovation.
One by one, from a lone chair atop a brightly lit stage, students and staff opened up about their journeys of coming out to the world. On Oct. 12, members of UCSF’s LGBTQ community came together for the 2nd Annual Coming Out Monologues, where brave voices volunteered to tell their stories. Hot on the heels of National Coming Out Day, the Monologues represented a night of unity for the queer community, where we could be vulnerable and discover how different yet relatable many of our experiences are. Between inspirational stories, videos of the OUTlist played where, similar to this event, members of the UCSF queer community spoke on their lived-in experiences.