Opinion

[Originally published in Synapse - The UCSF student newspaper, May 24, 2001] The University of California Board of Regents erased an embarrassing stain on the university’s reputation last week by rescinding their 1995 ban on affirmative action.

In my article on last year’s Chancellor’s Leadership Forum on Diversity and Inclusion, I wrote about a point of tension in which UCSF leadership was dismissive of the mental health concerns of an underrepresented student. This year, I want to highlight a topic that is often dismissed behind closed doors: mandatory training. The 11th Annual Chancellor’s Leadership Forum on Diversity and Inclusion focused on the climate surrounding UCSF staff. You can find a recording and summary of the forum online. It is required viewing to give perspective of an oft-overlooked part of the UCSF community.

UCSF Health recently launched a campaign for diversity and inclusion in light of the current political climate and national concerns over immigration.

Future healthcare professional and those interested in the topic owed it to themselves to be at the LGBTQIA+ Health Forum, held at UCSF’s Mission Bay campus on Feb. 24.

Getting through graduate school is challenging, but the process may get even harder if the tax plans being debated by Senate and House Republicans come to pass.

[Originally published in Synapse - The UCSF student newspaper, Volume 40, Number 8, 26 October 1995] On Oct. 18 the U.S. House of Representatives voted 231-201 to cut $270 billion dollars from Medicare over the next seven years. The AMA endorsed the Medicare cuts after wresting numerous concessions, including the preservation of physician payments at their current levels, a $250,000 limit on malpractice awards, the relaxation of Medicare claims fraud laws, and an exemption from state laws which will allow physician provider-service networks to set up managed care plans and receive Medicare funds.
Over a month ago I rode a few hours north to the quiet seclusion of Mendocino County to attend XRYSALIS, a retreat for trans and queer people of color (TQPOC). Many of us attending were seeking a place to just “be”; to enjoy one another’s company, to share our stories, to heal through honest discussion, and to exist — or at least discover how we could exist — outside of the white gaze.

The headlines this summer have been marred by one disturbing theme: an attack on diversity in the United States.

After a week of vacation I returned to my lab and an inbox crowded with emails. As I read through the 100 or so messages, I noticed a troubling theme emerging. There were emails condemning the hateful actions of white supremacists in Charlottesville, safety bulletins warning about the heat wave that hit San Francisco, and messages criticizing the president’s decision to rescind Deferred Actions for Childhood Arrival (DACA). Reading about hate, prejudice, and extreme weather (or as I was thinking about it, a gentle reminder of climate change) was a hard way to transition back into my normal routine. The familiar feeling of disheartenment that I had left behind while on vacation began to creep back into me.

I turned on the news and my home was underwater. Drowning.

I was just back in Houston for a visit in May. It was still true: everything in Texas is bigger, even bigger than you remember, especially after you’ve been away a while.