Academic

Federal regulations are establishing stronger rights for career women choosing to have babies in a variety of industries, but these protections aren’t taking hold in the world of academia.

Women are notoriously underrepresented in the world of politics.

Furiously mincing the last of the onion and mushrooms, aggressively churning the lentil marinara to a thick paste, and scrambling to arrange the last of the garnishes before, "Time's up!

Wearing my white coat with my stethoscope hanging around my neck, I knock. I introduce myself while going through a checklist in my mind: say hello, ask how the patient would like to be addressed, start with the chief complaint.

“I lived through WWII. A little needle is not going to hurt me,” said Ms. X as I screened her for vaccination contraindications.

“You get how much time for cardio?” My friend, a third year medical student at a different school, was a bit surprised at the reduced amount of time we have dedicated to Cardiology in the new Bridges curriculum compared to his.

“Mr. Hayward is a 45-year-old African-American male with hypertension who presents with dyspnea on exertion…” Patient narratives like the one above traditionally open with a mention of race. That has begun to change, however, as UCSF and peer institutions move to discourage this practice—in some cases as early as in the first months of medical school.
This year, UCSF introduced Bridges, a new curriculum for first year medical students. The new curriculum involves 1.5 preclinical years instead of two, and features three major components: Foundational Sciences (FS), Core Inquiry Curriculum (CIC), and Clinical Microsystems Clerkship (CMC). With so many moving parts, trying to understand each piece is a challenge even for the first year medical students experiencing the new curriculum. Synapse’s newest column, Crossing Bridges, provides an insider view from five first year medical students as they break down the new curriculum’s different components.
Dr. Kaveh Ashrafi started his life under circumstances many might think of as extremely challenging. Separated from his family at an early age because of the political circumstances in his native Iran, Ashrafi lived on his own in a previously unknown country for 18 months when he was just 13 years old.

Dr. Diane Barber is an Endowed Professor and Chair in the UCSF Department of Cell and Tissue Biology. Students in a number of graduate programs know Diane as the Director of the BMS260 Cell Biology core course.