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Thu
10
Apr
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Graduate Students Engage the Public Over Funding Basic Science Research

The graduate students prepare for videotaping their interviews with the public in San Francisco. Photo courtesy of Science Policy Group

By Marta Wegorzewska, Florie Charles and Nir Oksenberg
Contributing Writers

Over a pitcher of beer at Terzetto’s one afternoon, a group of us involved in the outreach branch of the Science Policy Group at UCSF brainstormed ways to educate the public about the importance of funding basic science research.

The annual Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) Stand Up For Science video contest was a great place to start The goal of the contest was “to increase the awareness of the critical role of federal agencies, such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF), in funding biomedical and biological research.”

Thu
10
Apr
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UCSF Police Department Up for Re-Accreditation

A team of assessors from the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc. (CALEA) will arrive April 13 to examine all aspects of the UCSF Police Department policy and procedures, management, operations and services against national best practices for the purposes of re-accreditation of the UCSF Police Department, Chief Pamela E. Roskowski announced today.

Thu
10
Apr
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Patient Safety: How to Reduce Diagnostic Errors

By Emma Sew Hoy and Nadya Hristeva
Contributing Writers

Have you ever driven on a familiar route without remembering how exactly you arrived at your destination? We are creatures of habit, and it is not unlikely that physicians may utilize habitual knowledge in making medical diagnoses.

Unfortunately, these skill-based activities may sometimes result in patient harm. We are human, and errors will undoubtedly occur—but why? 

At the last meeting of UCSF’s Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) Open School on March 11, Dr. Catherine Lucey, professor and vice dean of education at the UCSF School of Medicine explained how errors that occur in the healthcare setting parallel those of everyday life, and spoke about the common cognitive causes that turn activities into errors.

Thu
03
Apr
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Scientific Publishing In The Era of Open Access

Stacks of scientific journals on library shelves are becoming a vanishing sight as more publishers of- fer open access journals and other online subscription options. Photo by Mason Tran/DS4

This series explores the impact of open access journals on the scientific publishing industry. In this installment, we examine the publishing industry’s response to the growing popularity of open access journals.

Part 2

By Alexandra Greer
Science Editor

In October 2013, Science published an exposé of the peer review system at open access journals around the world. In his self-described “sting operation,” author John Bohannon submitted a critically flawed scientific article to hundreds of open access journals, with the intent of evaluating the quality of their peer review process.

Unlike the traditional closed access model of scientific publishing, in which subscription fees cover the cost of editing, publication and distribution of the scientific journal, open access journals are, as the name implies, free to access.

Thu
03
Apr
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GSICE Program Helps Graduate Students Career Options

Students chat during an "GSice-breaker" seeson of the Graduate Student Internships for Career Ex- ploration (GSICE) program. Photo by Ernesto Diaz-Flores/Postdoc

By Alexandra Loucks
Staff Writer

Imagine yourself five years out from getting your PhD.  You could be a science journalist working for a newspaper, or in a boardroom actively convincing venture capitalists which of the latest scientific advancements they should back.  Perhaps the thought of working with politicians in Washington, DC to reform STEM education policy makes your heart race. Or, maybe you are simply unsure if academia is the right trajectory for you but don’t know what else to do.

If the latter applies to you, you are not alone. As far back as 1998, a study published by the National Research Council stated that the number of academic, government and industry jobs was inadequate for the number of PhDs being churned out, revealing a need to drastically alter how graduate programs prepare students for future careers. 

Thu
03
Apr
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Students Get Insider Access With CTSI Catalyst Awards

Roeland Hancock (left), PhD, Catalyst Awardee, Digital Health track, with Benjamin Cohn, Catalyst Awards Program intern and biomedical sciences graduate student.

Staff Report

Are you a student interested in an insider’s perspective on what it means to translate therapeutics, diagnostics, devices, or digital health into products and services that improve health? If the answer is yes, then the Catalyst Awards Internship Program might just be for you.

“This experience introduces students to the process of translating basic research into valuable and commercially viable products, and helps them learn how to evaluate their own research for its potential to become a product,” said Irina Gitlin, PhD, senior program manager with UCSF’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI), which manages the program.

Mon
31
Mar
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'Call Me Maybe' Flashmob Dance Party Recalled

By T. Booth Haley
Staff Writer

What’s your fondest memory of dental school?

“The flashmob dance party is one of my best memories from dental school,” said Sarah Forbes, a fourth-year dental student, recalling a prank in June 2012, at the end of her second year.

The flashmob consisted of roughly 40 students—nearly half of the class—doing a choreographed dance routine to “Call Me Maybe,” by Carly Rae Jepsen.

It was the last class of the year and Dr. Daniel Mendoza was lecturing when a student started playing music in the back row of the lecture hall. Then Mason Tran, now a fourth-year student, began a solo breakdance in the front of the room before the rest of the posse joined in from their seats in the audience.

Thu
27
Mar
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Scientific Publishing: An Industry in Flux

Illustration by Jillian Varonin/BMS4

For scientists around the world, the open access movement has radically changed how journal articles are read and distributed by offering an alternative to the dominant subscription-based access model. Today, anyone can access at least some scientific articles on the web. In this three-part series, we examine the impact of open access journals on the scientific publishing industry.

Part I

By Alexandra Greer
Science Editor

As scientists and medical researchers at UCSF, we are accustomed to having ready access to the current body of scientific knowledge at our fingertips. It’s simply a matter of hopping on the Internet or heading over to the library. We give little thought to how this scientific data made its way to us. 

Thu
27
Mar
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DentStay Helps Minority Dental School Candidates Feel Welcome

Dinner with pre-dents: (left to right) Ramon Gutierrez (D3), Ngan Tran (D2), Yamrot Alemu (D2), Maxi- million Jensen (D3), Eric Brown (D2), Jennifer Villalta (pre-dent), Hannah Garcia (pre-dent), Whitney Bryant (pre-dent). Photo courtesy of DentStay.

By Angela Broad
Staff Writer

When Eric Brown and Yamrot Alemu were applying to dental schools, they would stay with students from campus minority organizations whenever possible, as a way to save money on housing before their interviews and gain valuable insight into campus life.

Now in their second year at UCSF School of Dentistry, they wondered why such a program didn’t exist here. So Brown, Alemu and classmate Ivy Fua, along with the Student National Dental Association (SNDA), formed DentStay this academic year.

The organization offers underrepresented minority (URM) students interviewees the opportunity to stay with a dental student of a similar background, relieving the candidates of the expense of staying in a hotel in San Francisco, which can cost several hundred dollars a night.

Thu
27
Mar
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Student Loan Consolidation: Should You, or Shouldn’t You?

By Carrie Steere-Salazar
Contributing Writer

Student debt is in the headlines, and offers to help consolidate and manage that debt are beginning to appear in advertisements on TV, radio and on the sides of the local MUNI buses.  But that special service comes at a price.  

“While students are enrolled and borrowing sensibly to meet their costs of attendance, there is little action that needs to take place,” said Carole Ann Simpson, UCSF’s new resource advisor in the Financial Aid Office.   “Loan consolidation, in almost every case, should not be considered until after graduation.  Students do not need to pay anyone in order to consolidate their student loans.”

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