Career

As scientists and physicians, our life missions depend on the clear dissemination of truth, so the current events can be particularly disheartening. It is critical that the facts we find and the truth we seek reach the public. Fortunately, this concern for truth-telling is felt beyond our local labs and clinics. The World Federation of Science Journalists, the National Association of Science Writers and the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing collaborated to sponsor last week’s World Conference of Science Journalists here in San Francisco.

“Ive always been fascinated with what people do for work. It’s what led me to explore a myriad of career options.

“I have been a nurse for over 40 years and a nurse practitioner for more than 20. I am a double alumna of UCSF, MS 1996, PhD 2012, and have been teaching in the Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program since 2000.

UCSF offers several resources to help students take advantage of the expanding career paths that have become available to scientists in recent decades. The first step is understanding the breadth of opportunities available to you.

“I grew up in Madison, WI dreaming of tidepooling, bioluminescence and biking Highway 1 through Big Sur. All of those came true when, after college, I sold everything I owned and took off on a cross country bike tour for a year and a half.

As scientists, we live in the nitty-gritty details and caveats of our work.

​By co-founding one medical startup company, a UCSF alumni is breaking several barriers at once. Dr. Sophia Yen, M.D., M.P.H., UCSF alumni of 1997, is striving to ease access to birth control while also encouraging women and minorities into an underrepresented field.

With a background spanning everything from philosophy to botany to structural biology, Dr.

Image of group of students sitting in circle.
Your training at UCSF will prepare you to be an excellent clinician or researcher, but did you know that the Office of Career and Professional Development (OCPD) can help you position yourself for a job or residency after you graduate? We help students and postdocs hone their professional skills, explore career paths and prepare for a successful job hunt.
It’s the time of year that students and postdocs ask about the most frustrating interview question: “What’s your weakness?” This seems to be the most misunderstood interview question, by candidates and interviewers alike. What’s the purpose of this question, and what’s an appropriate response?