Etc.

With the start of this year Synapse set out to some ambitious goals to highlight the depth and breadth of our student body.

Rental prices in the Bay Area are high enough to send any student into cardiac arrest from sticker shock.

Image of UCSF students protesting in San Francisco street.

Fifty years ago in 1965, a headline on the front page of Synapse read, “Revolution, Response: Viet Program Here.” On this day, the UC Medical Center (UCMC) presented an international symposium titled Revolution and Response in the Millberry Union

On this day in 1987, Dr. Dorothy Ford Bainton became the UCSF School of Medicine's first woman chair of the Department of Pathology. She was the first woman to chair a department in the school since its founding as Toland Medical College in 1864.
The Synapse issue that came out 25 years captured an exciting time in UCSF history. The front page was crowded with a number of memorable stories, with front-page stories “Doogie Howser Appointed to Faculty”, by Jean Yuss, “Trump Buys UCSF”, by Lo Sell Hi, and “UC cardiologist to fight Mike Tyson,” by Lowell Comb.
Four decades ago, the Synapse front page captured the discontent that would lead to this cap, which was just one of several measures in the Medical Injury Compensation Reform Act of 1975. “Legislature Stymied: Malpractice Crisis Threatens Hospital Jobs,” declared the headline of an article by Jacquelyn Brown. An accompanying article by Peter Bissell was headlined “Bay Area Doctor Protests Soaring Malpractice Rates.”
Cartoon character sitting down reading and upside down book, with tears rolling down his face
A half century ago, more than 95 percent of doctors were men and more than 95 percent of nurses were women. A couple of articles in the Synapse echoed this particularly stark gender gap with evidence of a particularly gendered idea of nursing.

On April 22, Chair of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, Dr. Kimberly Topp, PhD, gave an address that wove together stories from her personal and professional life. Dr.

Today, emergency medicine (EM) seems a solidly entrenched and respectable medical specialty. Compared to many specialties, however, it is a latecomer. The first emergency rooms were staffed in an ad hoc fashion by internal medicine and surgery residents. The first dedicated training program in EM was begun at the University of Cincinnati in 1970, and board certification in EM was first offered in 1979.

“Most of my clients are over 40 years old and they aren’t ready to slow down… I have clients in their 70’s and 80’s… I work with them to design a fitness plan that meets their needs.